Iconic pics of A Streetcar Named Desire stars Vivien Leigh, Marlon Brando

It’s been 70 years since the big-screen adaptation of Tennessee Williams’ hit play “A Streetcar Named Desire” opened in theaters on Sept. 18, 1951. Oscar-winning filmmaker Elia Kazan directed Marlon Brando as blue-collar factory parts salesman Stanley Kowalski and Vivien Leigh as former Southern belle Blanche DuBois in the lauded drama. (The duo are forced together when Blanche seeks refuge with her sister Stella — Stanley’s wife.) “Streetcar” was a massive hit at the box office and with critics alike — it went on to win four Academy Awards (including best lead actress for Vivien) and scored eight more Oscar nominations (including best picture, best director, best screenplay and best lead actor for Marlon). In honor of its big anniversary, Wonderwall.com is taking a look back at the most iconic photos of Vivien and Marlon from over the years.

Keep reading to take a walk down memory lane…

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The chemistry between Marlon Brando and Vivien Leigh was undeniable when they co-starred as Stanley Kowalski and Blanche DuBois in the 1951 adaptation of Tennessee Williams’ “A Streetcar Named Desire.”

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Marlon Brando shot into the spotlight after he starred as Stanley Kowalski in the 1951 adaptation of Tennessee Williams’ “A Streetcar Named Desire.” He scored his first Oscar nomination for his efforts.

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A baby-faced Vivien Leigh appeared in an undated portrait from early in her career.

A pre-fame Marlon Brando is pictured in 1943. He didn’t make his acting debut until six years later.

ICONIC! Vivien Leigh famously stared as Sacarlett O’Hara in 1939’s “Gone With the Wind.” She won her first Oscar for her efforts.

They’re one of the most iconic pairs to ever share the screen: Clark Gable starred as Rhett Butler opposite Vivien Leigh as Scarlett O’Hara in the 1939 adaptation of “Gone With the Wind.” The epic drama won eight Academy Awards (including best picture, best director, best screenplay and best lead actress for Vivien) and earned five more Oscar nominations (including best lead actor for Clark).

Marlon Brando made his feature film debut in the 1950 drama “The Men.” He starred as U.S. Army Lieutenant Ken Wilocek, who becomes wheelchair-bound after he’s shot by a sniper in battle.

Marlon Brando hopped on a bike for his role as the leader of a motorcycle club in 1953’s “The Wild One.”

Icons only! Vivien Leigh had the honor sharing the screen with a history-making star — American actress Hattie McDaniel — in the 1939 film adaptation of “Gone With the Wind.” When Hattie won the Academy Award for best supporting actress for her performance in the epic drama, she became the first Black person to win an Oscar.

Speaking of icons… Marlon Brando had a chat with another superstar, Judy Garland, as they sat together during the 1955 Golden Globe Awards in Los Angeles. (He won five Globes over the course of his career.)

Vivien Leigh beamed while posing with her Oscar for best actress for her performance as Scarlett O’Hara in “Gone With the Wind” on March 2, 1940.

The perfect spot! Vivien Leigh placed her Oscar for best actress for her performance as Scarlett O’Hara in “Gone With the Wind” on the mantle in her living room at her home in Beverly Hills on March 2, 1940.

Marlon Brando won his first Oscar for his performance as a dockworker and former boxer in the 1954 crime drama “On the Waterfront.”

Marlon Brando was all smiles while proudly posing with his Oscar for best lead actor for his work in “On the Waterfront” during the 27th Annual Academy Awards at the Pantages Theater in Hollywood on March 30, 1955.

Marlon Brando pecked Grace Kelly on the cheek as they posed with their Oscars — hers for best lead actress for her work in “The Country Girl” and his for best lead actor for his work in “On the Waterfront” — during the 27th Annual Academy Awards at the Pantages Theater in Hollywood on March 30, 1955.

Vivien Leigh and Laurence Olivier first co-starred in 1937’s “Fire Over England.” It was the beginning of a beautiful (albeit scandalous) partnership: They soon fell in love (even though they were both married to other people at the time) and had a passionate affair for several years until their spouses granted them divorces, freeing them up to tie the knot in 1940.

Vivien Leigh looked gorgeous in a close-up still from the 1937 historical drama “Fire Over England.” Is it any wonder she stole Laurence Olivier’s heart?!

Marlon Brando and his first wife, actress Anna Kashfi, posed together in 1957, a year after they tied the knot. They divorced in 1959 after welcoming son Christian Devi together.

In 1962, the same year Marlon Brando and Tarita Teriipaia appeared in the historical drama “Mutiny on the Bounty,” the comely co-stars tied the knot. The actor and his third wife were married for a decade and welcomed two kids together.

Well, this is awkward… Marlon Brando attended the late 1962 premiere of “Mutiny on the Bounty” — the film that introduced him to his third wife — with his second wife, actress Movita Castaneda. They were married from 1960 to 1962 and had two children together.

In 1940 — the same year they became husband and wife — Vivien Leigh and second husband Laurence Olivier co-starred in a stage production of William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet.”

Marlon Brando has also dabbled in Shakespeare. He starred as Mark Antony in the 1953 big-screen adaptation of “Julius Caesar.” He earned his third Oscar nomination for his work in the film.

Gorgeous! Vivien Leigh stunned in a portrait circa 1936.

Marlon Brando shocked longtime fans when he starred as gambler Sky Masterson in the 1955 adaptation of the Broadway musical “Guys and Dolls” — and did all his own singing!

It was a meeting of Old Hollywood power couples in London on July 16, 1956: Vivien Leigh and her second husband, Laurence Olivier, spent time with newlyweds Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller before Laurence and Marilyn co-starred in the 1957 rom-com “The Prince and the Showgirl.”

Marlon Brandon also spent time with Marilyn Monroe. They reportedly dated before she started seeing third husband Arthur Miller. They even attended the premiere of “The Rose Tattoo” together in 1955.

Another famous woman Marlon Brando romanced? Rita Moreno! She even visited him on the set of his 1954 historical drama “Désirée.”

Vivien Leigh and second husband Laurence Olivier shared the stage in a 1951 production of William Shakespeare’s “Antony and Cleopatra” at St. James’s Theatre in London.

Vivien Leigh also starred as Cleopatra in the 1946 film “Caesar and Cleopatra.” (And surprisingly, no, husband Laurence Olivier did not portray Caesar.)

Hollywood royalty meets real-life royalty! Vivien Leigh shared smiles with Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother in this snapshot circa 1947.

Vivien Leigh had another brush with real-life royalty in late 1955: She bowed and presented a bouquet of flowers to Queen Elizabeth II as Her Majesty arrived for the royal premiere of William Shakespeare’s “Richard III” — in which the actress’s husband, Laurence Olivier, starred — at the Leicester Square Theatre in London.

Sometime in the ’60s, actor-activist Marlon Brando hosted a press conference in Los Angeles to discuss his plans to participate in civil rights demonstrations in Maryland.

Vivien Leigh gave good face in an undated portrait from early in her career.

Vivien Leigh shared the screen with many handsome men over the course of her esteemed career, but perhaps none more comely than Warren Beatty — the man with whom she locked lips in 1961’s “The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone.”

Marlon Brando shared the screen with many of Hollywood’s most popular starlets. He and Elizabeth Taylor, for example, headlined the 1967 drama “Reflections in a Golden Eye.”

Marlon Brando and Sophia Loren, meanwhile, co-starred in the 1967 rom-com “A Countess from Hong Kong,” which was written and directed by Charlie Chaplin.

Vivien Leigh posed in a promotional photo for 1965’s “Ship of Fools” — her final film role before her death in 1967 at 53 following a decades-long battle with tuberculosis.

In 1972, Marlon Brando headlined one of the great films of all time: “The Godfather.” He won his second Oscar for his work as crime boss Vito Corleone in the epic drama.

If you thought her wardrobe as Scarlett O’Hara in “Gone With the Wind” was epic, take a look at this costume from Vivien Leigh’s turn as the titular aristocrat in the 1948 adaptation of “Anna Karenina.”

Vivien Leigh starred as the titular socialite opposite Ralph Richardson as Alexei Karenin, a cold government official, in the 1948 adaptation of Leo Tolstoy‘s “Anna Karenina.”

Marlon Brando starred as Jor-El — Superman’s biological father — in the 1978 “Superman” movie.

Vivien Leigh posed for a portrait circa 1955. She was in her early 40s at the time.

Another truly iconic performance for Marlon Brando! He portrayed Colonel Walter Kurtz — a U.S. Army Special Forces officer who goes rogue during the Vietnam War — in the 1979 epic war film “Apocalypse Now,” which is based on Joseph Conrad’s novella “Heart of Darkness.” Martin Sheen co-starred as an Army captain tasked with handling the situation.

A year after they tied the knot, Vivien Leigh and Laurence Olivier shared the screen in the 1941 historical drama “That Hamilton Woman.”

Marlon Brando cast actress Katy Jurado in the only film he ever directed: the 1961 Western “One-Eyed Jacks.” The duo were romantically involved for several years.

Vivien Leigh and Laurence Olivier stepped out together circa 1940 — around the time their first spouses granted them divorces.
















































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