Zayn Malik's sister asks for beautician's help despite lockdown

Zayn Malik’s sister Waliyha asks if one of her followers can do her eyebrows as an ’emergency’ despite the UK being in lockdown

Zayn Malik’s sister Waliyha has pleaded for help from her followers in finding someone to do her eyebrows, despite the fact the UK is in a third lockdown.

The 22-year-old took to Instagram on Tuesday over an ’emergency’ as she asked if anyone was a beautician or was able to help her in short notice.

Sharing a picture of her coat while she sat in a car, Waliyha wrote: ‘Does anyone know anyone who can do my eyebrows today? It’s an emergency.’

Seeking help: Zayn Malik’s sister Waliyha asked if one of her followers could do her eyebrows as an ’emergency’ on Tuesday, despite the UK being in lockdown

Waliyha appeared to not realise that beauticians are unable to be open during the UK’s third lockdown, nor could one visit her home.

Under tougher lockdown rules, it is currently illegal to meet ‘socially’ with people – and you cannot leave your home ‘for the purpose of recreation or leisure; eg a picnic or a social meeting’.

The current exercise regulations for England mean you can go out once per day for as long as you want to take part in exercise by yourself or with one other person.

However the Government fears the new lockdown rules are being exploited by people to meet up with friends for a coffee or an alcoholic drink in the park. 

Request: Waliyha took to Instagram to make her plea, but she appeared to not realise that beauticians are unable to be open during the UK’s third lockdown, nor could one visit her home

In December videos taken from the Bradford wedding of Zayn’s sister showed guests failing to follow social distancing rules.

A fan account shared a montage of clips taken by guests at the nuptials, which were reportedly attended by 40 people.

The smiling bridal party and guests are seen hugging and posing for group photos in the video before police broke up the event. 

Nuptials: In December videos taken from the Bradford wedding of Waliyah’s showed guests failing to follow social distancing rules

Around 40 guests attended the wedding, which took place at the home of Zayn’s sister, Saffa in Bradford.

Zayn’s younger sister Waliyha, 22 married ex-convict Junaid Khan, 24, in a traditional Islamic ceremony in a marquee that was erected in Saffa’s back garden which was followed by a reception in the same location. 

The city at the time was in Tier 3, where wedding ceremonies could take place with up to 15 people, but wedding receptions were not allowed.  

Party time: A fan account shared a montage of clips taken by guests at the nuptials, which were reportedly attended by 40 people, pictured the bride Waliyha

Interrupted! The wedding was broken up by police for breaching COVID regulations with officers issuing fines to relatives of the former One Direction star

MailOnline previously revealed that the reception was broken up by police, with officers arriving at the property at around 6pm after being called by neighbours.

West Yorkshire police confirmed that a number of other people were issued with fixed penalty notices. A spokesman told MailOnline: ‘Police attended an address just after 6pm on Saturday evening following a report of a large party.

‘A group of people were fined inside the address and fixed penalty notices were issued as a breach of coronavirus restrictions had been committed.’ 

The new lockdown in England at a glance 

England will be put into a full national lockdown that will last until the February half term. 

According to the new rules:  

  • All primary and secondary schools will close with immediate effect
  • Classes will remain only for vulnerable pupils and the children of key workers. 
  • The plan is for them to reopen after the February half-term break.
  • A-Level and GCSE exams are unlikely to go ahead as planned in the summer.
  • Universities will also remain closed to students until mid-February.
  • Nurseries will remain fully open. 
  • The public should stay at home unless they need to leave for one of just five reasons: If they cannot work from home, shopping for necessities, exercise, to give care and for medical treatment or emergencies.
  • All non-essential retailers, hospitality and ‘personal care’ like hairdressers must close.
  • Restaurants and other eateries can continue to operate for takeaways and deliveries. 
  • But pubs will no longer be allowed to offer take-away alcohol sales. 
  • Children’s playgrounds will remain open. 
  • All indoor and outdoor sports venues, including golf courses, gyms, swimming pools and tennis courts must close, and team sports cannot take place, even outdoors. 
  • Elite sports like the Premier League can go on under their own schemes.

The guidance is for people who are fit and well. 

There is additional advice for people who are clinically extremely vulnerable to coronavirus and households with a possible or confirmed coronavirus infection. 

They should not attend work, school, college or university, and limit the time you spend outside the home.  The guidance says you should only go out for medical appointments, exercise or if it is essential.

The rules for all people in England also state:  

  • You cannot leave your home to meet socially with anyone you do not live with or are not in a support bubble with (if you are legally permitted to form one).
  • You may exercise on your own, with one other person, or with your household or support bubble.
  • You should not meet other people you do not live with, or have formed a support bubble with, unless for a permitted reason.
  • Stay 2 metres apart from anyone not in your household.

Detailed guidance on the national lockdown:

You must not leave or be outside of your home except where you have a ‘reasonable excuse’. This will be put in law. The police can take action against you if you leave home without a ‘reasonable excuse’, and issue you with a fine (Fixed Penalty Notice).

You can be given a Fixed Penalty Notice of £200 for the first offence, doubling for further offences up to a maximum of £6,400.

A ‘reasonable excuse’ includes:

  • Work – you can only leave home for work purposes where it is unreasonable for you to do your job from home
  • Volunteering – you can also leave home to provide voluntary or charitable services
  • Essential activities – you can leave home to buy things at shops or obtain services. You may also leave your home to do these things on behalf of a disabled or vulnerable person or someone self-isolating
  • Education and childcare – you can only leave home for education, registered childcare, and supervised activities for children where they are eligible to attend. 
  • Meeting others and care – you can leave home to visit people in your support bubble ( if you are legally permitted to form one), to provide informal childcare for children under 14 as part of a childcare bubble (for example, to enable parents to work), to provide care for disabled or vulnerable people
  • Exercise – you can continue to exercise alone, with one other person or with your household or support bubble, limited to once per day, and not outside your local area 
  • Medical reasons – you can leave home for a medical reason, including to get a COVID-19 test, for medical appointments and emergencies
  • Harm and compassionate visits – you can leave home to be with someone who is giving birth, to avoid injury or illness or to escape risk of harm (such as domestic abuse). 
  • You can also leave home to visit someone who is dying or someone in a care home (if permitted under care home guidance), hospice, or hospital, or to accompany them to a medical appointment
  • Animal welfare reasons – you can leave home for animal welfare reasons, such as to attend veterinary services for advice or treatment
  • Communal worship and life events – You can leave home to attend or visit a place of worship for communal worship, a funeral or event related to a death, a burial ground or a remembrance garden, or to attend a wedding ceremony.

There are further reasonable excuses. For example, you may leave home to fulfil legal obligations or to carry out activities related to buying, selling, letting or renting a residential property, or where it is reasonably necessary for voting in an election or referendum.

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