Belgravia fans continue to blast the 'wooden' acting

Belgravia fans are left shocked as the Trenchards’ housekeeper considers betraying them – but continue to blast the ‘wooden’ acting and admit they’re switching off to re-watch Downton Abbey instead

  • Belgravia, ITV period drama by Julian Fellowes, follows life of Trenchard family 
  • They’ve recently ascended to the aristocratic society of London’s Belgravia 
  • Despite ending in a cliff hanger last night, some said the acting was ‘wooden’

Viewers were left astounded following the third episode of Belgravia last night – which saw the housekeeper consider betraying his employers, the Trenchards.

The British period drama follows the lives of the family, who have recently ascended to the aristocratic society of London’s Belgravia, as they navigate having a secret illegitimate grandson.  

Towards the end of the show, the Trenchards’ butler Turton was approached by villain John Bellasis to expose the family’s secrets – and fans were left wondering about what he planned to do.

But despite the dramatic cliff hanger, some viewers were once again left unimpressed with the ‘wooden’ acting and ‘clunky’ script.

Viewers were left astounded following the third episode of Belgravia last night – which saw the housekeeper consider betraying his employers, the Trenchards. Pictured: Tamsin Greig as Anne Trenchard and Alice Eve as Susan Trenchard

Towards the end of the show, the Trenchards’ butler Turton (pictured) was approached by villain John Bellasis to rat out the family’s secrets

But despite the dramatic cliff hanger, some viewers were once again left unimpressed with the ‘wooden’ acting (pictured)

One person said: ‘Favourite line from tonight’s increasingly terrible Belgravia: “Oh you are a card, Mrs Oliver”, uttered in a way so wooden it makes my fitted furniture seem animated.’

Another added: ‘So many good actors let down by clunky storylines and awful dialogue in Belgravia.

‘I was hoping for some nice escapism to take my mind off how s*** everything is, but this is not floating my boat at all.’  

Reaction: Some social media users (above) were quick to take to Twitter and express their displeasure at the most recent episode

Other Belgravia viewers also slammed the script, saying good actors were being let down by it

A third wrote: ‘I watched all six episodes of The English Game in one night until 5.30am. Far better than Belgravia,’ while a fourth said: ‘Goodness, bring back Downton Abbey.’ 

The third episode of Belgravia saw villain John Bellasis (played by Adam James) investigate the Trenchard family and their secrets – with the up-and-coming household having a hidden illegitimate grandson, named Charles Pope. 

John is determined to discover Charles’ relation to the family after seeing the Trenchards become close to the businessman, who also doesn’t realise the connection they share.  

Pictured (L-R) Alice Eve as Susan Trenchard, Ella Purnell as Lady Maria Grey, Jack Bardoe as Charles Pope, Harriet Walter as Lady Brockenhurst, Philip Glenister as James Tranchard, Tasmin Greig as Anne Trenchard and Tom Wilkinson as Earl of Brockenhurst

Yet it wasn’t all negative reviews for the British period drama, as others revealed how much they were enjoying the series

John corners the family’s housekeeper Turton (Paul Ritter) in the local pub and asks him to betray their confidence and reveal their secrets.

Viewers are left wondering whether the butler will agree to divulge all – including Charles’ (played by Jack Bardoe) true identity.

Taking to Twitter, viewers expressed their feelings about the ‘unlikable’ servants following the episode. 

Viewers (above) were left wondering whether the butler will agree to divulge all – including Charles’ (played by Jack Bardoe) true identity

One wrote: ‘These people must start checking to see if a servant is lurking before they start spilling the family secrets.’

Another said: ‘Watching Belgravia is making me grateful I don’t have servants! What happened to loyalty?’

A third wrote: ‘At least the servants in Downton Abbey were likeable,’ while a fourth added: ‘The Trenchards servants make Barrow and O’Brien look cuddly by comparison.’  

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