Happy Valentine’s Day! Here is the true story of the mysterious Saint Valentine

Valentine’s Day, or St Valentine’s Day, is an annual celebration of love on February 14.

That is today – so happy Valentine’s Day to you!

People around the world have various ways of celebrating the day – while others let it pass them by.

Some shower their loved ones in gifts, chocolates and flowers, or head out for a nice meal.

Maybe a homemade card is more your thing, or a nice home cooked meal.

However you celebrate it, Valentine’s Day is a firm part of our calendar in the UK – but the history of the day is actually much debated.

Here we discuss the true story of the mysterious Saint Valentine.

  • Valentine's Day chocolates and wine could cause nasty bouts of thrush, docs warn

  • Most awkward Valentine’s Day experiences that will make you cringe

Valentine’s Day is lined to two different saints, the legendary Christian martyrs Valentine of Rome and Valentine of Terni.

The Roman St Valentine was a priest and physician who persecuted by the Christian emperor Claudius II Gothicus about 270 AD.

It is widely believed the Emperor banned marriage because he thought married men were bad for soldiers.

St Valentine was said to have been beheaded near Rome for helping Christian couples get married.

  • M&S shoppers in stitches as supermarket launches 'Love Cucumbers' for Valentine's Day

According to legend, Pope Gelasius I referred to his acts as “being known only to God”.

The martyr’s grave was reportedly buried on Via Flaminia, and Pope Julius I is believed to have built a basilica over his grave.

Meanwhile, St Valentine could also be the Martyr bishop of Terni.

He was also persecuted by Claudius on the outskirts of Rome, and his relics were later taken to Terni.

There is confusion as to which martyr was the actual Saint Valentine.

  • Valentine's Day meal deals: Supermarket and restaurant offers unveiled

According to another legend, before the martyr was killed on February 14, he sent the jailer’s daughter a letter and signed it “from your Valentine”.

He had befriended her and healed her from blindness.

Other stories suggest Valentine may have been killed or trying to help Christians escape harsh prisons.

Although the truth behind the legend remains murky, all the stories talk of a sympathetic, heroic and romantic figure.

Source: Read Full Article