Brazilian cops uncover 'monstrous' £2.5million haul of Nazi items

Brazilian cops uncover ‘monstrous’ £2.5million haul of Nazi memorabilia and weapons at home of ‘insane psychopath’ accused of raping a child

  • Aylson Proenca Doyle Linhares, 58, was arrested on Tuesday at his home in Rio
  • He is accused of raping a minor and abusing several children in the local area
  • Rio police officers discovered a huge haul of Nazi memorabilia at his home including uniforms, flags, weapons and a mock-up Nazi identification document
  • He was arrested after parents in his neighbourhood reported him for allegedly abusing their 12-year-old son 
  • Linhares is thought to have abused several children in the Vargem Grande region west of the city
  • The lead detective in charge of the case labelled him ‘an insane psychopath’ 

A haul of Nazi memorabilia and weapons worth an estimated £2.5million has been found at the home of a suspected paedophile according to police in Rio de Janeiro on Wednesday.

The 58-year-old suspect, identified as Aylson Proenca Doyle Linhares, was arrested on Tuesday after parents from his local neighborhood reported him for allegedly abusing their 12-year-old son.

Rio’s civil police said they discovered more than 1,000 items at the home of Linhares, including Nazi uniforms, periodicals, paintings, Nazi insignia, images of Adolf Hitler, flags and medals of the Third Reich.

They also WWII-era found guns and ammunition, along with a mock-up Nazi identification document complete with Linhares’ personal details.

Images released by the Rio de Janeiro Civil Police show Nazi uniforms, weapons and documents found at Linares’ residence in the Vargem Grande neighbourhood west of the city

His home was packed with Nazi memorabilia including a variety of Nazi uniforms and clothing

Daggers and nine firearms were also found, including a rifle and a machine gun, as well as a large stash of ammunition

The haul was discovered after police went to the man’s home to serve an arrest warrant on suspicions he had raped a minor and abused other children in the Vargem Grande region west of the city. 

Linhares was charged with illegal possession of weapons, racial discrimination and paedophilia, after police also found photos of minors at his property according to Luis Armond, the lead detective in charge of the case. 

Armond described Linhares as an ‘insane psychopath’, and estimated his staggering collection, which police said contained ‘monstrous material’, to be worth several millions of euros.

‘He is a smart guy and articulate, but he’s a Holocaust denier, he’s homophobic, he’s a pedophile and he says he hunts homosexuals,’ Armond told Reuters. 

‘I’m no doctor, but he seems to me an insane psychopath.’

Armond said the suspect came from a wealthy family of investors and likely had used his inheritance to build the collection. 

Linhares reportedly told police his collection was worth between 2.5 million and 3 million euros, ‘although that is unverifiable,’ Armond added. 

Armond estimated that just one high-ranking Nazi uniform would cost around 250,000 euros. 

Rio police are now probing the suspect’s connection to Nazi and other far-right groups.

Reuters reported the police they are trying to ascertain whether Linares was still active in the marketplace for Nazi memorabilia. 

This could help police track down the brokers and sellers of such material, and could also potentially lead them to other Nazi enthusiasts and criminals.  

Armond said a museum would need to be found for the collection.

Among the thousands of Nazi items and memorabilia found by police were several framed photos and busts of Adolf Hitler adorning Linhares’ residence.

Daggers and nine firearms were also found, including a rifle and a machine gun, as well as a large stash of ammunition. 

In the final months of WWII and in the years following the war, thousands of Nazis are thought to have fled to South America to escape being brought to justice after the collapse of the Third Reich. 

In 2012, German prosecutors were granted access to files in Brazil and Chile that purported to show a record of Third Reich sympathizers that had immigrated to the continent from Europe following the war.

According to the documents, an estimated 9,000 war criminals escaped to South America, including Croatians, Ukrainians, Russians and other western Europeans who aided the Nazi murder machine.

Several notorious Nazis such as Adolf Eichmann (left), one of the architects of the Holocaust, also escaped to South America

The infamous doctor Josef Mengele, often referred to as ‘the Angel of Death’ who carried out genetic research on humans, also lived for some years in South America

As many as 5,000 went to Argentina; between 1,500 and 2,000 are thought to have made it to Brazil; around 500 to 1,000 to Chile; and the rest to Paraguay and Uruguay.

But many people believe the true number of Nazis who escaped to South America is in fact far higher. 

Several notorious Nazis such as Adolf Eichmann, one of the architects of the Holocaust, also escaped to South America.

He lived under a pseudonym until he was captured by Israeli intelligence agents in Buenos Aires in 1960. He was later executed. 

The infamous doctor Josef Mengele, often referred to as ‘the Angel of Death’ who carried out genetic research on Jews, also lived for some years in the city, before moving around South America to evade the authorities.

Unlike Eichmann, Mengele managed to elude his captors for 34 years before dying in 1979 after suffering a stroke. 

Last year, researchers combing through a Nazi base in Buenos Aires discovered a list of over 12,000 Nazis who had left Europe to live in Argentina during the 1930s, just prior to WWII. 

Researchers have discovered a list of 12,000 Nazis who lived in Argentina in the 1930s including many who hid stolen money in Swiss bank accounts


The long-forgotten list was found in a store room at a former Nazi headquarters in Buenos Aires and handed to the Nazi-hunting Simon Wiesenthal Centre

The list of Nazis was drawn up in the 1930s and seized by an anti-Nazi administration which took power in 1938.  

Many such records were burned when another pro-Nazi regime took power in 1943. 

However, the surviving list was discovered by Argentine investigator Pedro Filipuzzi and handed to directors at the Wiesenthal Centre. 

Many of the Nazis on the list held funds that were sent to a bank called Schweizerische Kreditanstalt, now known as Credit Suisse. 

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