Covid UK: Mother and daughter die after 11 family members met at Xmas

Mother and daughter both die from coronavirus within a month of each other after 11 family members who met up on Christmas Day all contracted the virus

  • Kashmir and Paramjeet Bains, of Wolverhampton, died with Covid in New Year
  • Mother and daughter tested positive for virus after Christmas Day gathering
  • Paramjeet, 43, had Down’s syndrome and had major seizure in hospital
  • Her brother Indy Bains has raised more than £11,000 for Wolverhampton Trust 

A mother and daughter both died within a month of each other after 11 members of the same family all tested positive for Covid-19 after gathering on Christmas Day.  

Their heartbroken family said Kashmir Bains, 64, and her 43-year-old daughter Paramjeet, of Wolverhampton, fell ill after testing positive for the virus.

The daughter, who had Down’s syndrome and struggled with her mental health during the lockdown, had a seizure in New Cross Hospital and died in early January. 

Her mother died four weeks later, after family turned off the life support machines, according to the Wolverhampton Express and Star.

Indy Bains, their son and brother who also battled Covid, called the loss of both family members ‘devastating’ and has raised £11,000 through a JustGiving page for The Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust Charity.

He said the family gathered on Christmas Day, adhered to the Government’s three-household rule and ‘played safe’, meeting for just a few hours.

‘We didn’t meet anyone else beforehand, no-one had any symptoms, we still don’t know who brought the virus into the family, into the house, but it’s happened and it’s something we’ll have to live with for the rest of our lives,’ Indy said.

Heartbroken family said Kashmir Bains, 64, and her 43-year-old daughter Paramjeet, of Wolverhampton, fell ill after testing positive for the virus

The daughter, who had Down’s syndrome and struggled with her mental health during the lockdown, had a seizure in New Cross Hospital and died in early January. Her mother died four weeks later, after family reportedly turned off the life support machines

Indy told the Express and Star that his younger sister Ambi was the first to get symptoms around December 28 and later tested positive.

Her husband and three children all then tested positive, followed by Indy, his wife and son, as well as their mother Kashmir, father Nash and older sister Paramjeet.

Though most had just mild symptoms of the virus, Kashmir and Paramjeet fell seriously ill and were taken to hospital. 

‘When the ambulances took them away, we just thought, ‘Well they’re in the right place, they’ll get treatment,’ we never thought once that they wouldn’t return home,’ Indy told the local newspaper this week.

Both mother and daughter then spent time in intensive care at New Cross Hospital, while Paramjeet had struggled to understand why she had to wear a CPAP mask – which helps patients breathe more easily.

‘The mask covered most of her face and she found it really uncomfortable and didn’t want to keep it on,’ Indy said. ‘It was heartbreaking for us as my dad and I kept begging her to keep it on, but she just couldn’t do it.’ 

Indy Bains, their son and brother who also battled Covid, called the loss of both family members ‘devastating’ and has raised £11,000 through a JustGiving page for The Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust Charity

‘Because of her [Paramjeet’s] learning disability she didn’t really understand what was happening to her, and I guess she thought that the mask was just obstructing the air flow rather than helping her and she kept pulling it off.

‘We spent the last few hours pleading, begging her to keep it on, so that she could get the oxygen that she required… but she just couldn’t do it, and kept pulling it off, it was heartbreaking for us to see.’ 

Paramjeet’s condition worsened, and she suffered a major seizure before dying on January 5. The trauma of seeing her oldest daughter pass away is said to have then taken its toll on 65-year-old Kashmir.

Indy said his mother Kashmir battled the virus for another three weeks, but died after the family decided to turn off the life support machines on February 2. 

He set up a JustGiving page in memory of his sister and mother to raise funds for The Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust Charity.  

Leanne Bood, fundraising co-ordinator for the Trust, said: ‘It is so humbling when families that have lost loved ones want to give something back by supporting the incredible work of the Trust and our hard working staff.

‘We were overwhelmed that the page has raised nearly £10,000 in such a short amount of time. Thank you to everyone that contributed, it will help Intensive Care Unit and Acute Medical Unit immensely.’

Who is at high risk from Covid-19?

People at high risk from coronavirus are those who:

  • have had an organ transplant;
  • are having chemotherapy or antibody treatment for cancer, including immunotherapy;
  • are having an intense course of radiotherapy (radical radiotherapy) for lung cancer;
  • are having targeted cancer treatments that can affect the immune system (such as protein kinase inhibitors or PARP inhibitors);
  • have blood or bone marrow cancer (such as leukaemia, lymphoma or myeloma);
  • have had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant in the past 6 months, or are still taking immunosuppressant medicine;
  • have been told by a doctor you have a severe lung condition (such as cystic fibrosis, severe asthma or severe COPD);
  • have a condition that means you have a very high risk of getting infections (such as SCID or sickle cell);
  • are taking medicine that makes you much more likely to get infections (such as high doses of steroids or immunosuppressant medicine);
  • have a serious heart condition and are pregnant;
  • have a problem with your spleen or your spleen has been removed (splenectomy);
  • are an adult with Down’s syndrome;
  • are an adult who is having dialysis or has severe (stage 5) long-term kidney disease;
  • have been classed as clinically extremely vulnerable, based on clinical judgement and an assessment of your needs.

People at moderate risk from coronavirus are those who:

  • are 70 or older;
  • have a lung condition that’s not severe (such as asthma, COPD, emphysema or bronchitis); 
  • have heart disease (such as heart failure);
  • have diabetes;
  • have chronic kidney disease;
  • have liver disease (such as hepatitis);
  • have a condition affecting the brain or nerves (such as Parkinson’s disease, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis or cerebral palsy);
  • have a condition that means they have a high risk of getting infections;
  • are taking medicine that can affect the immune system (such as low doses of steroids);
  • are very obese (a BMI of 40 or above);
  • are pregnant. 

Source: NHS

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