Disabled man, 28, given ‘rocket-propelled’ sex life as therapist teaches him erotic sex acts – The Sun

A DISABLED man has been given a "rocket-propelled" sex life after being taught to perform erotic sex acts by a therapist.

Thomas Williams, 28, from Staffordshire, suffers from cerebral palsy, and said he thought he was "ineligible" for a sex life before meeting full-time "sex surrogate" Sue Newsome.



Newsome, 58, doesn't have sex with her clients, but works with them to explore their sexuality and develop through one-on-one, hands-on coaching.

She says they range from 20-somethings to people in their sixties, and that around 60 percent have some form of disability.

She also sees people who struggle with intimacy and anxiety, have experienced sexual trauma, or who have difficulty reaching orgasm.

Williams said he had never had an erotic experience of any kind before meeting Newsome.

He now sees her once a month for sessions costing £65 to £100, and learns about healthy sexual practices and how to boost his confidence.

“Working with a sex surrogate has blasted a great, big, rocket-propelled grenade through the myth that I am disabled and I therefore have relinquished the right to sexual expression,” Williams said.

“That’s bollocks!”

Newsome says that working with disabled clients means tailoring her treatment to their specific needs.

“The first part of my work with them is meeting them and really understanding what it is they want help with,” she said.

"But also really getting a feel for what their environment is, what their living situation is, and also fully understanding their physical situation — what are their limitations?”

'IT'S HAD A MASSIVE IMPACT'

Williams receives disability benefits from the government, but pays for the service himself because sex surrogacy is not considered a health necessity.

He first began seeing Newsome after confiding his frustrations to Cheryl Birch, a nurse who cares for him.

Birch said: "I didn't know this service was on offer to people.

"It's not sordid like people would assume.

"It's just a massive impact on a person that's entitled to it."

She added that Williams had become a "much happier person" since beginning the therapy.

"His frustration just in general life seems to have changed.

"For me, it's quite rewarding to see that journey."

Newsome said: "If by working with someone, I can help them finding some more joy, or a greater sense of self, then that, for me, is magic."

A version of this story originally appeared on NYPost.com.




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