Downton Abbey creator Julian Fellowes wants to set the show in 1970s

Dowagers to disco: Downton Abbey creator Julian Fellowes raises prospect of setting the show in the 1970s to see the fate of Lord Grantham’s heirs

  • Downton Abbey’s creator has raised prospect of reviving the historical drama 
  • Julian Fellowes wants to set the drama in the 1970s to see out the Thatcher years 
  • He said it would enable the show’s fans to see the fate of Lord Grantham’s heirs 
  • Added such a project was ‘not on the cards at the moment’ as he focuses on film 

The fondue set has been cleared away, and Carson has been sent to fetch the Arctic Roll before the guests retire for a glass or two of Mateus Rosé…

It sounds as if Downton Abbey has got its historical facts wrong.

But the show’s creator, Julian Fellowes, has raised the tantalising prospect of reviving the drama and setting it in the late 1970s at the start of the Thatcher years. 

He said it would enable fans to see the fate of Lord Grantham’s heirs and whether the stately home had been sold or fallen into disrepair during the 1970s and into the 1980s.

Lord Fellowes said: ‘I think that would be quite fun for television and would, of course, allow us to recast because… the children would have grown into adults.’

Downton Abbey’s creator, Julian Fellowes, has raised the tantalising prospect of reviving the drama and setting it in the late 1970s at the start of the Thatcher years (file image)

But he added that such a project was ‘not on the cards at the moment’ because his focus is on a second film.

The ITV series, which first aired a decade ago, ended in 2015 as the setting reached the late 1920s. 

He said it would enable fans to see the fate of Lord Grantham’s heirs and whether the stately home had been sold or fallen into disrepair during the 1970s and into the 1980s (file image)

The show attracted a global audience of up to 200 million as viewers were drawn by its unashamed romantic streak and sub-plots involving class struggles and illicit liaisons. 

A film released last year took more than £150 million.

Reflecting on its success, Lord Fellowes said: ‘This has been ten years that shook my life. People get so immersed with the characters that you have made up. They cry over them, worry about them and think about them.’ 

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