Emmy Rossum makes vaccine plea as she shares first photo of her baby: 'Stop being an irresponsible idiot'

Emmy Rossum has kept her motherhood journey largely under wraps, waiting until she'd given birth to a baby girl on May 24 to share her first pregnancy photo. But the Shameless actress is now ready to introduce her daughter to the world in the hopes of encouraging people to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

On Sunday, the new mom, 34, posted a shot of her kissing her 2-month-old baby along with a caption sharing how she'd been vaccinated during her pregnancy. According to the Mystic River star, that means her daughter has antibodies protecting her from the coronavirus. 

"When I was pregnant I got vaccinated," Rossum, who is married to director and producer Sam Esmail, wrote. "Not only did we have a healthy, beautiful baby girl but we also just learned our daughter now has antibodies. In short, stop being an irresponsible idiot and get the vaccine."

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A post shared by Emmy Rossum (@emmy)

Esmail shared a similar message on Twitter.

When @emmyrossum was pregnant she got vaccinated. Not only did we have a healthy, beautiful baby girl but we also just discovered our daughter now has antibodies. In short, stop being an irresponsible idiot and get the vaccine.

— Sam Esmail (@samesmail) July 25, 2021

Rossum's message fetched support and congratulations from many followers, including Rosie O'Donnell and former Shameless co-star Justin Chatwin. But it also riled up commenters with anti-vaccination views, including one who shot back, "How about you do you and I’ll do me? Stick to your day job Emmy!"

Though it notes that there is limited data regarding COVID-19 vaccines and pregnancy, guidance from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention says that the vaccines "are unlikely to pose a risk for people who are pregnant." Pregnant people are, however, "at an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19 when compared with non-pregnant people." The CDC goes on to encourage pregnant people to consider: "your risk of exposure to COVID-19, the risks of severe illness, the known benefits of vaccination and the limited but growing evidence about the safety of vaccinations during pregnancy," and suggests speaking to a healthcare provider. 

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