Ex-PM Cameron admits using Greensill private jet 'a handful of times'

Ex-PM David Cameron admits using private jet belonging to financier Lex Greensill ‘a handful of times’ but says he paid tax ‘appropriately’ for travelling in comfort

  • Ex-premier said he used Lex Greensill’s jet ‘a handful of times’, in letter to MPs 
  • Multiple investigations into his lobbying of senior ministers are underway
  • Australian firm Greensill Capital it collapsed earlier this year

Former prime minister David Cameron admitted using a private  jet belonging to a controversial financier today – but insisted he paid ‘appropriately’ for the privilege.

The ex-premier said he used Lex Greensill’s jet ‘a handful of times’, in a letter to MPs. 

Tory Mr Cameron has  come in for massive criticism for his work with the Australian’s firm Greensill Capital, after it collapsed earlier this year.

Multiple investigations into his lobbying of senior ministers and Government officials are underway, including one by the Treasury Committee.

Its chairman Mel Stride wrote to the former prime minister after he gave evidence last month with a series of follow-up questions, including on his use of the private jet.

Such journeys are liable for air passenger duty.

In his reply, published today, Mr Cameron said: ‘I can confirm that I did use the company plane a handful of times on a personal basis, all for short haul flights, and tax was paid appropriately for any benefit received.’

He gave no details of the start or finish of the journeys, amid claims he used the aircraft to visit his second home in Cornwall.

The ex-premier said he used Lex Greensill’s jet ‘a handful of times’, in a letter to MPs.

Mr Greensill once had a fleet of four private aircraft

Tory Mr Cameron has come in for massive criticism for his work with the Australian’s firm Greensill Capital, after it collapsed earlier this year.

Mr Greensill is embroiled in a row over lobbying involving Cameron, and the Downing Street access given to private firms.

His company was involved in supply-chain finance, which ensures that suppliers get paid more rapidly by their customers than normal. 

It emerged earlier this year that he was handed a job as a Crown Representative in 2014, even boasting his own No10 business cards and email address, while running the firm.

A series of investigations have been launched into the role Mr Cameron played in securing Whitehall access for Lex Greensill, whose firm Greensill Capital collapsed earlier this year, putting thousands of jobs at risk, particularly in the steel sector. 

Earlier this year it emerged Mr Cameron sent text messages to the Chancellor Rishi Sunak and other top ministers at the Treasury, top figures at the bank of England ans senior civil servants as he sought to gain access to Government-backed coronavirus loans for his employer Greensill.  

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