Extravagant ex-bank house with safe room goes on sale for £700,000

Safe as houses! Extravagant 19th century bank designed by Edinburgh Dome architect David Rhind that comes with original strong room goes on sale for £700,000

  • Seven bedroom home in Blairgowrie, Perthshire, was originally built for former Commercial Bank of Scotland
  • The three-storey house still has a number of original features including a strong room and original fireplaces
  • The 183-year-old building was designed by prominent architect David Rhind, who designed Edinburgh Dome

A 19th century former bank house, complete with its own safe room, has gone up for sale for £700,000.

The stunning seven bedroom home in Blairgowrie, Perthshire, was originally built for the former Commercial Bank of Scotland.

It was designed by prominent Scottish architect David Rhind, the mastermind behind Edinburgh’s Dome – the former Commercial Bank of Scotland’s headquarters – as well as Stewart’s Melville College

The 183-year-old building, known as The Old Bank House, is now on the market as a home, having been carefully restored.

The quirky three-storey property features its original 18sqft strong room, alongside other features such as the domestic staff internal bell system and authentic fireplaces. 

The former bank house (pictured) in Scotland, complete with its own 19th century safe room, has gone up for sale for £700,000

The stunning seven bedroom home in Blairgowrie, Perthshire, was originally built for the former Commercial Bank of Scotland. Pictured: The dining rooms in the house

It was designed by prominent Scottish architect David Rhind, the mastermind behind Edinburgh’s Dome – the former Commercial Bank of Scotland’s headquarters – and Stewart’s Melville College. Pictured: One of the living rooms inside the house

The master bedroom features a grand four poster bed, with views out into the back garden of the 183-year-old property

The quirky three-storey home features its original 18sqft strong room, alongside other original features such as the domestic staff internal bell system and original fireplaces (such as the one pictured here)

The house features a safe room (pictured) where the money would have been kept while the building was in use as a bank house

Images of the property show the lavishly decorated interior decorated in rich golds and reds.

Ornate fireplaces and traditional sash windows adorn the rooms, which maintain their distinctive Victorian character.

The master bedroom features a grand four poster bed, with views out into the foliage.

Outside, the property is equally impressive and boasts an attractive garden area. 

Images of the property show the lavishly decorated interior decorated in rich golds and reds, such as rich red carpets and gold ornaments

The 183-year-old building, known as The Old Bank House, is on the market as a home, having been carefully restored to include its features – such as the authentic columns (pictured)

Ornate fireplaces and traditional sash windows adorn the rooms, which maintain their distinctive Victorian character 

Outside, the property is equally impressive and boasts an attractive garden area behind the lovely three storey house 

The building was one of the first buildings created by Rhind before he went on to create the headquarters to the Commercial Bank of Scotland in George Street in 1847 which is now the Dome bar and restaurant. 

Arguably his most iconic creation was the Daniel Stewart’s hospital in 1855, which was later turned into a fee paying school in 1870 and eventually merged with Stewart’s Melville College.

The impressive home is being sold by Strutt and Parker for offers in the region of £695,000.

The three storey building was one of the first buildings created by Rhind before he went on to create the headquarters to the Commercial Bank of Scotland in George Street in 1847 which is now the Dome bar and restaurant. Pictured: One of the property’s bathrooms

The impressive home is being sold by Strutt and Parker for offers in the region of £695,000. Pictured: One of the living room spaces in the property

The sellers say that it has the potential to become a business or a family home, as well as the opportunity to develop the partially floored attic and basement of the property.

Strutt and Parker describe the property on their site as a, ‘Light-filled, flexible accommodation arranged over three floors with period features.

‘Concealed within the property is the original 18 sq. ft. secure walk in safe room which could be utilised for wine, valuables or gun storage.’

David Rhind: The prominent 19th century Scottish architect who left a lasting legacy in his home town

David Rhind was a prominent Scottish architect in the 1800s. Born in Edinburgh in 1808, was the son of a lawyer, John Rhind, while his mother was Marion Anderson.

Rhind is believed to have left Edinburgh for London, learning his trade at the drawing office of Augustus Charles Pugin – an Anglo-French artist, architectural draughtsman and writer.

He later returned to his home town of Edinburgh, where he set up practice, working in conjunction with sculpture Alexander Handyside Ritchie.

Rhind’s main bulk of work was for the Commercial Bank of Scotland – now part of Royal Bank of Scotland – designing a number of their buildings.

But by far his most prominent design was that of the Edinburgh Dome. Located on George Street, in the heart of the city’s New Town district, the building was once the headquarters of Commercial Bank of Scotland.

The building is in a Graeco-Roman style and stands on the site of the former Physicians Hall, home to the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh. 

By far his most prominent design was that of the Edinburgh Dome (pictured). Located on George Street, in the heart of the city’s New Town district, the building was once the headquarters of Commercial Bank of Scotland

The current building is a Grade A listed and is home to Caledonian Heritable, a hotel, bars and restaurant group founded by entrepreneur Kevin Doyle.

Alongside Edinburgh Dome, Rhind also designed a number of churches, local government buildings, schools, offices and private residences such as Carlowrie Castle.  

One of his largest schemes was Daniel Stewart’s Hospital in Edinburgh – a hospital for needy boys within the city which was funded by a grant from Mr Stewart as part of his will.

The building is now home to Stewart’s Melville College, which is an independent day and boarding school – whose alumni include popular radio DJ Stuart Henry and watercolour painter Sir William Russell Flint.

One of his largest schemes was Daniel Stewart’s Hospital in Edinburgh – a hospital for needy boys within the city which was funded by a grant from Mr Stewart as part of his will. The building is now home to Stewart’s Melville College (pictured), which is an independent day and boarding school – whose alumni include popular radio DJ Stuart Henry and watercolour painter Sir William Russell Flint.

During his working lift, Rhind was appointed as an architect to the Trustees of Daniel Stewart and to the Life Association of Scotland. 

In 1836, Rhind was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh and contributed to the Society for the Promotion of the Fine Arts in Scotland. 

Rhind, an active Freemason who spent most of his working life at 54 Great King Street in Edinburgh, was married twice.

He married Emily Shoubridge who died in 1840, when she was only twenty-eight. He married again in 1845, to Mary Jane Sackville-Pearson and started a second family. He was survived by eight children.

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