Jail term for date rape drug GHB should increase, experts say

Jail term for possessing date rape drug GHB should increase from a maximum of two years to five, experts say

  • Government advisors suggest penalty for GHB possession increase to five years
  • Even a small dose can cause victims to fall unconscious if it is slipped into drink  
  • Drug was used by Reynhard Sinaga, 36, to attack at least 136 men in Manchester

The maximum jail sentence for possessing date rape drug GHB should increase from two years to five, Government advisers recommend.

GHB has been described as the ‘rapist’s weapon of choice’ and was used by PHD student Reynhard Sinaga, 36, to attack at least 136 men in Manchester.

The Home Office’s Advisory Committee on the Misuse of Drugs is understood to recommend GHB should be moved from Class C to Class B in a report published tomorrow. It means the penalty for possession would increase to five years, sources told the Mail. The maximum sentence for dealers would remain 14 years.

The chemical is widely sold online as an industrial solvent. Even a small dose can cause victims to fall unconscious if it is slipped into a drink by sex attackers. 

GHB has been described as the ‘rapist’s weapon of choice’. The chemical is also used as a rust and paint remover, and a nail varnish thinner. File photo

It is not yet clear how ministers propose to deal with legitimate purchases of the chemical, which is also used as a rust and paint remover, and a nail varnish thinner.

Sinaga, a churchgoing PhD student, preyed on young men in Manchester and filmed his sickening attacks.

He was convicted of 159 attacks, including 136 rapes and a host of other sex crimes.

Police admit the true number of victims preyed on by the 36-year-old may be far higher, and many have never been traced.

When he was handed a 30 year sentence in January this year, a judge described Sinaga as a ‘monster’.

The drug was used by PHD student Reynhard Sinaga, 36, (pictured) to attack at least 136 men in Manchester

GHB was also used by ‘wicked and monstrous’ serial killer Stephen Port, who poisoned four young men with lethal doses of the drug.

The chef lured his victims to his flat before giving them GHB. He used fake suicide notes in a bid to cover up two of his murders.

Porta was handed a ‘whole life’ tariff – meaning he will die in jail – at the Old Bailey in 2016.

Ministers will now have to decide whether to act on the ACMD’s recommendations.

Changes to the drug’s classification under the Misuse of Drugs act 1971 can be introduced quickly under secondary legislation.

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