New York City's streets are eerily empty amid the coronavirus crisis

New York City’s streets are eerily empty amid the coronavirus crisis with a few locals braving the outdoors wearing masks as state surpasses 25,000 cases

  • New York City has turned into a ghost town due to the coronavirus outbreak as residents stay indoors 
  • The Big Apple’s subway system that usually shuttles millions of commuters a day is now desolate, with the few passengers who brave the journey wearing protective face masks and plastic gloves
  • Even tourist destinations like Times Square and the glamorous Fifth Avenue are completely deserted 
  • As of Tuesday New York has more than 25,600 cases of the killer coronavirus in the state and 210 deaths
  • Overnight, there were 2,500 cases in New York City and nearly 5,000 in the state of New York 
  • Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should you see a doctor?

New York City’s streets continue to be an eerie and disturbing sight, empty of tourists and residents as locals shutter themselves indoors to avoid the coronavirus outbreak. 

The Big Apple’s subway system that usually shuttles millions of commuters a day is now desolate, with the few passengers who brave the journey wearing protective face masks and plastic gloves.  

The Dumbo area and Brooklyn Bridge Park were completely empty on Tuesday afternoon, despite the sunshine and clear skies that typically draw crowds to the scenic site. 

Even tourist destinations like Times Square and the glamorous Fifth Avenue are completely deserted of visitors and traffic. 

As of Tuesday, New York has more than 25,600 cases of the killer coronavirus, more than nine times as many cases as the next highest state. 

New York City’s streets continue to be an eerie and disturbing sight, empty of tourists and residents as locals shutter themselves indoors to avoid the coronavirus outbreak. The empty streets of Times Square in Midtown Manhattan pictured Tuesday afternoon

The Dumbo area of Brooklyn was completely empty on Tuesday afternoon, despite the sunshine and clear skies that typically draw crowds to the scenic site

A playground sits empty in the Dumbo area of Brooklyn on Tuesday as children and adults alike stay inside their homes

A girl waves from her apartment in Dumbo, Brooklyn in New York City on Tuesday as the city’s lockdown continues

A man took advantage of the empty streets to go for a jog on Tuesday morning as the city has closed businesses and workers were ordered to work from home

This scenic photo spot in Dumbo, Brooklyn, usually teeming with tourists and photographers trying to get the perfect shot, was shockingly empty on Tuesday afternoon due to the coronavirus pandemic 

The empty streets of Manhattan pictured Tuesday in New York City with just a few cars on the road in light of the sweeping COVID-19 pandemic

New York’s cases alone account for seven percent of the global number of cases. Overnight, there were 2,500 cases in New York City and nearly 5,000 in the state of New York.

Nationwide there are more than 50,000 cases and there have been at least 624 deaths.

New York City alone had 13,119 cases as of Monday night. At least 2,213 of those patients are hospitalized and 525 are in the intensive care unit, as per CNN. 

On Monday, health expert Dr. Deborah Birx said in a news briefing with President Donald Trump that the greater New York City area has an ‘attack rate close to one in a thousand’. That’s five times higher than other areas and states. 

The Times Square subway station was practically empty on Tuesday afternoon. Typically this stop is bustling with life full of tourists, commuters and buskers 

A man pictured walking in the Union Square subway station wearing a mask and gloves to protect himself on Tuesday in NYC

A shuttered tourist store in Midtown Manhattan pictured above on Tuesday afternoon. It’s not clear when businesses will be given the green light to open up again

In Midtown few people were seen walking in the streets, many of them armed with masks to protect themselves from catching the contagious COVID-19 virus, as the case toll in NYC mounts to over 25,000

This group of women wore face masks as they strolled through Midtown, Manhattan on Tuesday afternoon

Experts warn that New Yorkers should anticipate to see cases rise and are urging residents to stay home at all costs. Pedestrians with Target shopping bags pictured in Midtown, Manhattan on Tuesday

The iconic Charging Bull statue in Manhattan’s Financial District strikes a lonely figure Tuesday, despite usually being a tourist attraction

‘(New Yorkers are) the group that needs to absolutely social distance and self isolate at this time. Clearly the virus had been circling there for a number of weeks to have this level of penetrance into the community,’ she said. 

On Tuesday, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo lambasted President Trump for sending only 400 ventilators to New York from the federal stockpile of 20,000 when the state needs 30,000 to battle coronavirus as he warned other states they would soon see a spike in cases of their own.

Speaking at the Javits Center, which will become a temporary field hospital in New York City with 1,000 hospital beds, Cuomo revealed that the number of coronavirus cases across the state of New York had risen to 25,000 and 15,000 in New York City, overnight.

‘You pick the 26,000 who are going to die because you only sent 400 ventilators,’ he said on Tuesday in an angry plea to the government to share more.

Cuomo described New York as the ‘canary in the coal mine’ of the virus pandemic.

‘We have the highest and fastest rate of infection,’ he said, adding that it was not because New Yorkers were any less healthy than other states but that it was the state doing the most testing and therefore producing the highest number of positive cases.

‘We’re just getting there first – deploy the resources here in New York for our apex and then after the apex passes here, once we’re passed the critical point, deploy the ventilators to where they are needed.

‘We are just a test case. That’s how the nation should look at it. Look at us today.

‘Where we are today, you will be in three weeks, four weeks, six weeks – we are your future and what we do here will chart the course for what you do.

‘I’m not asking you to help New York just to help New York. I’m asking you to help New York to help yourselves.’

 

 

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