Tattoo fans show off their favourite work at Great British Tattoo Show

Tat’s a bit far! Tattoo lover gets inked on her bottom as thousands descend on the Great British Tattoo Show

  • The two-day event was held at Alexandra Palace, north London, and hosted more than 300 tattoo artists
  • One attendee lay on her front and toyed with her mobile while she had rose tattoos applied to her bottom
  • Event also hosted weird and wonderful traders, from fashion and jewellery to the macabre and taxidermy 

Buttocks, bellies and backs were on display en masse this weekend as the Great British Tattoo Show took place in north London.

One attendee at the event, held at Alexandra Palace, calmly lay on her front and toyed with her mobile while she had rose tattoos applied to her left bottom cheek.

Meanwhile, a man was pictured having his tummy – which already featured a giant eyeball and colourful characters including Batman’s nemesis The Joker – inked with yet another design.

The two-day show hosted more than 300 tattoo artists – and members of the public could walk in and get a tattoo or watch others in the open exhibition space… 

One attendee at the Great British Tattoo Show, held at Alexandra Palace, calmly lay on her front and toyed with her mobile while she had rose tattoos applied to her left buttock

There’s always room for more – with this man having yet another inking on his already colourful tummy at the two-day event in north London

The spectacular show hosted more than 300 tattoo artists – and members of the public could walk in and get a tattoo or watch others in the open exhibition space

As well as inkings galore – including this very pink ink set-up – there was also a wealth of weird and wonderful traders, from fashion and jewellery to the macabre and taxidermy

Sometimes it’s best not to look, like this man decided as he got some tats done on his left arm to complement his right one – and head. Other entertainment came in the form of sideshows, burlesque, live music and fashion shows

There was also a wealth of weird and wonderful traders, from fashion and jewellery to the macabre and taxidermy. 

Other entertainment came in the form of sideshows, burlesque, live music and fashion shows – along with a snake charmer.

Throughout the spectacular event, there were also plenty of tattoo contests.

These included Best Blackwork, Best Traditional, Best Colour, Best Oriental and Best Realism. 

Two tattooed women enter the show, which also featured several fiercely contested tattoo contests over the weekend

The process of getting a tattoo involves pushing ink down into your ‘second layer’ of skin – or the dermis

One woman came prepared with a book, and food and drink, to distract her from the painful inking process

Probably best not to tell this chap, but… in the same way that your body tries to force out splinters, it will recognise the ink as a foreign object and try to remove it

The contests open to the public included Best Blackwork, Best Traditional, Best Colour, Best Oriental and Best Realism. (But not Best Words On Head)

Having a tattoo alters the way people sweat, research revealed last April. Tattooing involves permanently placing ink around 3-5mm under the skin, which is the same depth as sweat glands. (Above, a woman getting an inking at the show)

Tattoo, too much: Why inkings fade over time… and how they alter the way you sweat

The process of getting a tattoo involves pushing ink down into your ‘second layer’ of skin, or the dermis.  

In the same way that your body tries to force out splinters, it will recognise this ink as a foreign object and try to remove it.

The way it does this is to send white blood cells to destroy the ink particles. The only problem is that the ink particles are larger than the white blood cells, making this process extremely slow.

Slam d-inking! A man has a tattoo of a basketball player applied to his leg during the Great British Tattoo Show this weekend

This is why tattoos start to fade naturally after a few decades.

Also, having a tattoo alters the way people sweat, research revealed last April.

Tattooed skin produces less sweat, while the perspiration it does secrete is higher in sodium, a study by Alma College in Michigan found.

Tattooing involves permanently placing ink around 3-5mm under the skin, which is the same depth as sweat glands.

Whether a person’s long-term health is affected by reduced sweating is unclear, however, perspiration is critical to regulating body temperature, with overheating eventually causing heatstroke. 

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