The rich brats of social media are finally getting their comeuppance

Remember the 20th century? Phones had dials; the closest thing anyone had to Internet erotica was waiting up until midnight for the Soloflex infomercial, and — most outdated of all — people who had money tried to be discreet about it.

None of those things would make sense to a child born after the year 2000. Today, every teenager is their own media brand, with all the technology they need to broadcast their lives on their smartphone, usually via the social media platform TikTok.

The cultural pressures of wealth and celebrity are explored in my new book, “Gatecrasher,” but the past weeks have also brought fresh evidence that public opinion may finally be turning against young “influencers.”

The trend for boasting about money began with hashtags like #daddysmoney and #richboycheck, in which teens of means competed to flaunt their material possessions.

“The hot new thing on TikTok is bragging about money,” Lucas Cruikshank, a 26-year-old influencer whose YouTube channel has over 3 million subscribers, explained in a video posted on his channel in December. “Which I love — if somebody’s entire social media personality is, ‘I’m rich, I have so much money,’ I’ll follow them. Because it’s just entertaining, and I like seeing the life they live.”

My favorite trio at the minute ? #SV #harley #pista

♬ Litty (feat. Tory Lanez) – Meek Mill