Ex-police chief 'was indecently assaulted by TWO senior colleagues'

Former police chief claims she was indecently assaulted by TWO senior colleagues during her career… and one was allowed to keep his job even after she complained

  • Ex-Nottinghamshire police chief Sue Fish said she was groped twice by officers
  • She said she had reported one of the assaults but the culprit stayed in his job 
  • Former chief constable pioneered policy of recording misogyny as hate crime 

Former Nottinghamshire chief constable Sue Fish said that she had reported one of the sexual assaults but the culprit remained in his job

A retired police chief has revealed that she was groped twice by senior officers early in her career.

Former Nottinghamshire chief constable Sue Fish said that she had reported one of the sexual assaults but the culprit remained in his job.

She later pioneered a policy of recording misogyny as a hate crime.

Mrs Fish said: ‘Two of my particularly unpleasant experiences as a police officer were both… technically indecent assaults, both of them. I didn’t report one at all and I did the second one. Unwanted touching would be probably the best way of describing it.’

She said she had felt unable to report the first assault because it was unlikely anyone would believe the allegations against a senior, well-regarded officer. 

She had reported the second assault, by a man from a different force, but though it was made clear to him his behaviour was inappropriate, he remained in his senior role.

Mrs Fish joined Nottinghamshire as a constable in 1986 and worked in uniform and detective roles for forces including Nottinghamshire, the West Midlands and the Met.

It is not clear where she was working when the incidents took place.

Mrs Fish joined Nottinghamshire as a constable in 1986 and worked in uniform and detective roles for forces including Nottinghamshire, the West Midlands and the Met

She led Nottinghamshire Police until three years ago and said she feared such assaults are still being carried out in forces across Britain today. 

In an interview with ITV Tonight, due to be broadcast tomorrow evening, she added: ‘There are so many good people in policing, male and female, [but] there is still what I hope is a minority… that’s absolutely toxic.

‘It’s still carrying on, despite the best endeavours of the leadership of the service. It still goes on.’

Mrs Fish said the abduction and murder of Sarah Everard, for which a police officer is the prime suspect, should act as ‘wake-up call’ to the force.

She led Nottinghamshire Police until three years ago and said she feared such assaults are still being carried out in forces across Britain today

She said: ‘I hope that the tragic events of the past few weeks will actually serve as a wake-up call to policing, that this actually is really important.

‘If we want women as half our population to have confidence in their police service, the police service needs to listen and to respond accordingly.’

Mrs Fish was the first chief constable to introduce recording misogyny as a hate crime in 2016, a measure which was later adopted by about a quarter of forces in England and Wales.

Last month peers agreed an amendment to the Domestic Abuse Bill that would make it a requirement for all forces.

The former chief constable, who was made an OBE for services to policing in 2008, has previously said senior colleagues across the country closed ranks on her when she brought it in.

Nottinghamshire Police has been contacted for comment.

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