Hunters face a total ban on bringing big game trophies back to the UK

Hunters face a total ban on bringing big game trophies back to the UK but campaigners fear a ‘blood money’ exemption for those who pay for conservation

  • Almost 200 trophies were brought into the UK in 2019 alone including 15 tusks  
  • Environment Secretary rules out an exemption to hunters funding conservation
  • George Eustice vows to introduce the ‘toughest legislation in the world’ this year

The Government insists that hunters will face a total ban on bringing trophies of lions, elephants, rhinos and other endangered species back to the UK.

Campaigners fear a ‘blood money’ exemption could allow hunters to still ship trophies if they pay towards conservation.

But Environment Secretary George Eustice is said to have ruled that out and intends to introduce the ‘toughest legislation in the world’ later this year.

Almost 200 trophies were brought into the UK in 2019, including 15 tusks and other trophies of African elephants, 12 leopard and 12 lion trophies, according to official figures

A Whitehall source last night promised a ‘robust ban’ that would include all species on the ‘endangered’ and ‘critically endangered’ lists compiled by The International Union for Conservation of Nature.

A Westminster source told The Mail on Sunday: ‘There’s no point having loopholes. We will be announcing details soon, but campaigners will be very happy with it. It’s going to go much further than existing controls.’

Almost 200 trophies were brought into the UK in 2019, including 15 tusks and other trophies of African elephants, 12 leopard and 12 lion trophies, according to official figures.

At present, a hunter who wants to bring in parts of a threatened species needs a permit from the Government to ensure that taking the trophy is not ‘detrimental’ to species conservation.

According to a recent opinion poll, 85 per cent of people want trophy hunting outlawed.

Campaigners fear a ‘blood money’ exemption could allow hunters to still ship trophies if they pay towards conservation. But Environment Secretary George Eustice is said to have ruled that out

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