Pictured: Baby born by C section before mother nurse died of Covid-19

Pictured: Baby born by emergency C section before her mother nurse died from Covid-19 as grieving husband says she should not have been working in hospital while heavily-pregnant

  • Mary Agyeiwaa Agyapong died in Luton after undergoing emergency caesarean
  • The 28-year-old gave birth to a little girl shortly after contracting coronavirus
  • Her husband, Ernest Boateng paid tribute to his ‘very kind’ and ‘genuine’ wife
  • Here’s how to help people impacted by Covid-19

This heartbreaking picture shows a baby born by emergency c-section shortly before her mother died from coronavirus – as the grieving husband says his heavily-pregnant wife should not have been working in hospital at the time. 

Mary Agyeiwaa Agyapong passed away just days after being admitted to Luton and Dunstable Hospital on Tuesday April 7, where she worked as a nurse. 

The 28-year-old, who was 35 weeks pregnant when she tested positive for Covid-19, underwent an emergency caesarean to save her daughter. The little girl was born, but tragically the mother died just days later on Easter Sunday.

Two weeks before her death, her father Stephen, also died of suspected Covid-19.  

Her widowed husband Ernest Boateng, 30, has told the BBC that Mary was officially on sick leave before the first Covid-19 patient was admitted on to her ward, and paid tribute to his ‘very kind’ wife.

The 28-year-old, who was 35 weeks pregnant when she tested positive for Covid-19, underwent an emergency caesarean to save her daughter (pictured).


Mary Agyeiwaa Agyapong, 28, pictured left, died after undergoing an emergency caesarean to deliver and save her baby daughter Two weeks before her death, her father Stephen, (pictured right) also died of suspected Covid-19

Her widowed husband Ernest Boateng, 30, has told the BBC that Mary was officially on sick leave before the first Covid-19 patient was admitted on to her ward, and paid tribute to his ‘very kind’ wife

Speaking from his home in Luton, Ernest said: ‘When Mary passed, I had a call from one of the union reps.

‘He told me confidentially that he had met Mary on the ward, and told her, Mary it’s not safe for you, you need to get out of here.

‘But she said she couldn’t help it. She was helpless.’

Ernest told the BBC that his wife of three and a half years was ‘really worried’ – and used to come home from work, undress on the doorstep, and go straight to have a shower before even stopping to talk to him.

He said: ‘There is no amount of words that can really explain how I’m feeling within.

‘She was very kind. Her heart was pure, and she was very genuine. We know everybody is not perfect, but Mary was.

‘We all wish she was here to breastfeed her daughter, and to see her grow and give her the best of care.’ 

Colleagues at Luton and Dunstable Hospital said Mary (pictured) was ‘a fabulous nurse, and a great example of what we stand for’

An inquest opening, held last month (May 21) at Bedfordshire Coroner’s Court, gave Mary’s cause of death as pneumonia and Covid-19.

A further inquest hearing is listed for September 30.

When contacted this morning, Mr Boateng declined to comment further and referred callers to his lawyer. 

Her brother Charles Agyapong previously told MailOnline: ‘We are now mourning for two members of our family – first my father and now Mary. It is a very hard time for us. We need time to grieve.’ 

Mary was eight months pregnant when she died and stopped working at 28 weeks, as permitted in official guidance, which hospital bosses said they followed. 

However, it led to calls at the time for a rethink, with campaigners insisting: ‘All pregnant women shouldn’t be on the frontline.’

Organisations supporting pregnant healthcare workers across the UK previously said hundreds were told they must work – sometimes without PPE – even though they feared for the lives of their unborn children.

Joeli Brearley, founder of campaign group Pregnant Then Screwed, said: ‘The death of Mary Agyeiwaa Agyapong could have been prevented. 

‘A child will now grow up without her mother – this tragedy could have been prevented.’ 

Pictured: Luton and Dunstable Hospital The Bedfordshire Hospitals NHS Trust told the BBC: ‘We were extremely saddened to lose Mary

Mary tested positive for Covid-19 and was admitted to hospital on April 7 and had the emergency caesarean within days. 

Doctors initially thought the nurse was showing signs of improving afterwards but her symptoms got worse again and she died on Sunday. 

Health secretary Matt Hancock described Mary’s story as a ‘terrible one’ in an interview with BBC Breakfast.

He added: ‘It’s something that I feel very strongly and I think the whole country, uniting as we are in our support for the NHS and carers across the board.

‘We are all deeply touched and moved by deaths of nurses like this.’  

The Bedfordshire Hospitals NHS Trust told the BBC: ‘We were extremely saddened to lose Mary. She worked here for five years and was a highly valued and loved member of our team, a fantastic nurse and a great example of what we stand for in this Trust.

‘We have carried out a full internal review into the circumstances surrounding her death and we are confident that she received the best possible care and support from the Trust.

‘We have sent our deepest condolences to Mr Boateng, and are currently working through a number of issues he has raised.’

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