Tax cheats made to choose between jail or becoming an informant

‘You can spend 20 years in jail or wear a wire for us’: High-flying tax cheats will be turned into informants in US-style crackdown inspired by lawyer who nailed FIFA for corruption

  • Lisa Osofosky plans to crack down on white collar crime using of informants
  • Tax cheats will be given the choice of going to jail or working for the government
  • She will work with HM Revenue and Customs to uncover corporate criminals
  • Ms Osofosky said informants are an effective way of exposing corporate crime 

High-flying tax cheats will be made to choose between jail or becoming an informant under new plans to crack down on white collar crime.

New plans to tackle white collar crime will see offenders be made to choose between jail time or become an informant.

Lisa Osofosky, Director of Serious Frauds Office, gave an overview of her plans to work with HM Revenue and Customs to uncover corporate criminals.

She told The Evening Standard: ‘You can spend 20 years in jail for what you did or wear a wire and work with us.’ 

Lisa Osofosky (pictured), Director of Serious Frauds Office, plans to crack down on white collar crime by giving offenders the decision to choose between jail or become an informant 

The former FBI lawyer said previous cases of using tax cheats as government informants in the US have proven to be an effective way of exposing corporate corruption. 

‘Just look at the Fifa case: the IRS and the FBI stopping Chuck Blazer on a street corner in New York – he’s got tax exposure. If law enforcement can share enough about the bad guys, we can figure out who are the most worthy targets,’ she said.

Blazer, who died in 2017, was an American Fifa committee member who accepted bribes for the World Cup Bids in 1998 and 2010.

He became an informant in for the government after the FBI and IRS found his uncovered his multi-million dollar hidden wealth and over a decades worth of unpaid taxes.

The former FBI lawyer said previous cases of using tax cheats as government informants have proven to be an effective way of exposing corporate corruption, and referred to Chuck Blazer’s (left) time as an informant which lead to the fall of former FIFA president Sepp Blatter (right)

Ms Osofosky said: ‘I see huge potential out there if you have got folks who have committed criminal acts possibly being willing to work with the law enforcement’

His role as an informant lead to the downfall of former FIFA president Sepp Blatter who was served a six year ban from the football federation in 2016.

Ms Osofosky, who was appointed Director of the Serious Fraud Office last August said there is a ‘huge potential’ white collar criminals willing to become informants.

‘I see huge potential out there if you have got folks who have committed criminal acts possibly being willing to work with the law enforcement.’ 

She has also vowed to fight the flow of ‘dirty money’ – foreign money from countries where leaders or dictators have significant investments in the UK – into the capital and drive up the price of housing.

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