TV announcer's child gatecrashes his link between programmes

‘Hello, I am Daddy and this is going to be…’: Hilarious moment TV announcer’s child gatecrashes his link between programmes

  • Pete Nottage about to introduce The Secret Life of the Zoo when child interrupts 
  • Child takes hold of mic and tries to impersonate  father by speaking to viewers
  • The announcer later took to social media to share the comical TV link with others

This is the hilarious moment a live TV link on Channel 4 is gatecrashed by the announcer’s child.

Voiceover artist and presenter Pete Nottage had been about to introduce the documentary series The Secret Life of the Zoo when his child gained control of the mic and decided to take charge of the broadcast as he worked from home.

Mr Nottage took to social media to share a clip of his infant impersonating him and comically telling viewers: ‘Hello, I am Daddy.’

The Channel 4 continuity announcer Pete Nottage (pictured) had been about to introduce  The Secret Life of the Zoo when his child decided to gatecrash his TV link

The presenter, who was working from home, took to social media to share the comical audio with others 

The child can be heard getting hold of the mic and taking charge of the live broadcast as the channel’s link begins to play

During the clip, which has since received more than 8,000 views on Twitter, the continuity announcer’s child can be heard taking over the mic and telling C4 viewers: ‘Hello, I am Daddy and this is going to be…’

Just seconds later, Mr Nottage interjects and says: ‘Hey, hey what’s going on? No, no no. Out of the way. Go to Mummy.’

Despite the comical interruption, the presenter continues with the announcement, saying: ‘The Secret Life of the Zoo available to stream now on All 4 –  the UK’s biggest free streaming service!’

The announcer, who also works as the station voice at BBC 6Music and Manchester United Television (MUTV), later took to Twitter to share the comical clip with others alongside the caption: ‘The perils of announcing from home. Ruddy kids.’

One social media user wrote ‘it was all going so well’ before Mr Nottage replied: ‘Then I showed up and spoiled it.’

While another added: ‘This is brilliant! You are a ledge Pete Nottage.’

Another person commented: ‘Funny it was The Secret Life of the Zoo too lol (sic).’

Meanwhile another viewer wrote: ‘Ha ha! Brilliant.’

Mr Nottage realises his child has taken hold of the live link and can be heard asking: ‘What’s going on?’ 

One user told Mr Nottage that it was ‘going so well’ before the announcer comically replied: ‘Then I showed up and spoiled it’

Social media users shared their amusement with the clip, with one calling Mr Nottage ‘a ledge’

MailOnline has approached Channel 4 and Pete Nottage for comment. 

The comical scenes come less than a year after Dr Clare Wenham, from South London, was interrupted by her young daughter Scarlett as she appeared on BBC News to discuss the coronavirus crisis.

After Dr Wenham apologised, Scarlett remained in the room and began rearranging a shelf behind her, trying to figure out where to put a picture she had painted of a unicorn. 

‘Mummy, where do you want this picture, she asked, before repeating, ‘Mummy, where do you want it?’

After attempting to continue the interview, the presenter addressed the little girl saying: ‘Scarlett, I think it looks better on the lower shelf. It’s a lovely unicorn.’   

Meanwhile in 2017, Robert Kelly, an associate professor of Political Science at Pusan National University in Busan, was answering questions on the South Korean president, Park Geun-hye, being ousted from power when his daughter Marion, then four, burst into the room. 

In 2017, Professor Robert Kelly became an instant sensation after his daughter Marion, then four, burst into her father’s office for the world to see

The professor’s son James then excitedly made his way into the room in a walker.

Just moments later, Mr Kelly’s wife Jung-a Kim came skidding through the threshold and grabbed the two children before attempting to drag them out of the room. 

Talking about working from home with his young children, Professor Kelly later told the BBC: ‘It’s tough for us. As you can see, it’s very difficult.

‘Employers who have employees with kids this age; they’re fighting all the time, they’ve got nothing to do, they’re climbing the walls, it’s just really really tough.’ 

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